Archive for Parents

Aug
25

Learn About GAPRA 9/14 and 9/22!

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Hello, all! Blair and Jane here, it’s back to school for everyone, and it’s time to learn more about GAPRA, the Global Alliance for Preventing Relational Aggression.

Visit http://www.gapraconnect.com/media/ to read our news release about GAPRA on the Media page. We’re excited to share this free series of informational and Q&A calls about GAPRA in September, and we hope you’ll join us. The calls (and recordings) are free, and when you attend, we’ll let you know how to get a special bonus offer!

So register for that free call now by clicking here!

In Part 1, I covered ways of being with a grieving girl when her friendship ends.  In Part II, I show you a sample conversation to help you guide your daughter or student through her grief.  I’ve included a simple technique you can use anytime to help kids put difficult times into perspective.

For the purpose of simplicity, we enter the following conversation with the understanding steps have previously been taken to save this relationship.

Girl:  Grace won’t be my friend anymore.  It’s over for good.

Adult:  It seems final.  What’s that like for you? (reflection and question to gauge perspective)

Girl:  I can’t stand it!  I’m not going back to school!  I don’t have any friends.

Adult:  Without Grace, there’s no one else. (reflection)

Girl:  No!  No one like Grace!

Adult:  There’s no one like Grace. (reflection)  I wonder if there’s someone else who might turn out to be a good friend.  (planting seed)

Girl:  I want Grace!  I don’t want anyone else.

Adult:  Grace is your only choice (reflection), yet she doesn’t want to be friends with you (presenting problem).  I wonder what you’ll do. (prompting thinking)

Girl:  I don’t know! 

Adult:  I think I can help. First, let’s figure out how big this problem is.                  

(Draw a 1 – 10 scale).

 

I______2______3______4______5______6______7______8______9______10

 

Let’s make #1 the best thing that could ever happen to you.  What would that be?

Girl:  (She will decide but may need your prompting or brainstorming)

Adult:  OK, so that’s your #1.  Now, what’s the worst thing that could happen?

Girl:  (She will decide but may need your prompting or brainstorming)

(A typical answer is the death of a loved one.  If the girl were to say, “Grace not being my friend,” counter with other examples.  You could say, “Is that worse than our house burning down, us moving away, ________ dying, a natural disaster ruining our city, or Mom/Dad losing her/his job?”  Choose an example you know would impact her.                              

Adult: Let’s make that your #10.  Now where does losing Grace land on the scale?

(From this point on, you will know the gravity the girl rates her loss.  Whether it’s high, low, or in the middle, there is now a point of reference.  I’ll now take the conversation two different ways.)

When the Number is High

Adult:  You chose #7.  Losing Grace is hitting you pretty hard and must be causing you a lot of stress.  With that amount of stress, we’ll have to figure out things you can do right away to help your body stay healthy and cope with it.  When your body feels better, you probably will be able to deal with the loss of Grace’s friendship more effectively.  Let’s start with ways you can help your body and mind feel better fast, and then we can talk about strategies to help you through the loss of Grace and toward finding other friends.

(Immediate stress relief can come through exercise, journaling, drawing or other artwork, parental TLC, baths or showers, doing favorite things, etc.  Being gentle with oneself at this time increases opportunities to rationally think about the situation and come up alternative friendship ideas)

When the Number is Low

Adult:  You chose #3.  Even though losing Grace seems and feels big, you’ve shown both of us that it’s not as big as you first had thought.  What’s that like for you?

Child:  It still hurts.

Adult:  I’m sure it does, but I’m glad it’s not a high number.  A #3 shows me that you have the strength to get through it.  I know you can do it.  Would you like my help?

Understanding grief and your child’s reaction to it, will help you guide her through difficult times.  Teaching kids to understand, acknowledge, and respect the feelings that come with grief, is one of the greatest gifts you can EVER give a child.  The skills are useful throughout life, for they increase problem solving skills, healthy attitudes, and good mental health.

 

 

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC

 

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

 

Comments (2)

 

Did you ever consider the end to a friendship a death?  It is, you know.  It’s the death of a relationship, and the depth and longevity of the bond impacts the magnitude of grief.  When a friendship ends, especially through relational aggression, grief is compounded and complicated by feelings of betrayal.

It’s a hard enough situation for adults to navigate, so imagine how children and teenagers feel.  (It’s a problem if you can’t imagine it!)  Adults have had more life experience to gauge their own severity of loss and also have a fully developed brain (age 25 and up) to get through it.  Those adult assets – experience and maturity – are blessings if you understand these three things:

  1. Loss comes in different forms.
  2. Meeting a person where they are in their loss journey is important to healing.
  3. What a person feels is what they feel.

Let’s go deeper.

1. Loss comes in different forms.  It’s the end of something, be it temporary or permanent.  A permanent loss is the physical death of a person, place, or thing.  When a person or pet dies, their physical presence is no longer available to you.  The World Trade Center was permanently destroyed on September 11, 2001.  Even if it were rebuilt replicating the original, it wouldn’t be the same.  Natural disasters such as flooding, tsunamis, earthquakes, and tornados permanently alter geographic locations.

Another realm of loss is that it can be temporary or permanent, long-standing or brief.  Examples include the loss of:  identity, grounding, happiness, a dream or goal, status, belief in self or others, balance offset by a situational event, or relationship changes.

2. When you meet someone where they are emotionally, you must release your own personal expectations, judgments, hypotheses, and comparisons to listen empathically and fully.  Their problem or loss is about them unfettered by your stuff.  When you leave your stuff at the door, it allows you to meet the other person where THEY are.  That is the starting place.

3. Feelings are feelings.  They are neither right nor wrong; they just are.  I own my feeling and you own yours.  I also own the depth of my feelings, and so do you.  This, too, is neither right nor wrong.  It just is. Think back to when you were a child or teen.  Choose a situation where you felt devastated but find it trivial or humorous now.  Back then you felt what you felt, and no coaxing could help you feel differently.

Remember these points when your daughter is grieving the death of a friendship:
•Don’t tell her things aren’t as bad as she makes them out to be.
•Don’t give any “things could be so much worse” lectures.
•Don’t tell her how little or big her problem is.
•Don’t speak negatively about the other girl.
•Do tell her how you feel about the other girl’s part in the situation.
•Do listen empathically.
•Do try to determine the kind and extent of her loss.  In a friendship loss, she could lose her identity, feeling grounded, ability to focus, appetite, etc.  Guide her to determine whether her loss is permanent or if it could be temporary.  Watch for symptoms of depression.
•Do ask if she would like hear about some of your experiences and how you felt about them then and now.  Respect her answer.
•Do ask her what she needs to move forward.
•Do tell her you will be there for her to listen and to help.

In Part 2, I will illustrate how to have a helpful conversation with your daughter when she experiences the death of a friendship through emotional bullying.  I’ll also give you a quick and easy strategy that you can use ANYWHERE to help her put friendship problems or other experiences in perspective.

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

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What Would You Do If a Girl Called You a Mean Name?

In a recent When Girls Hurt Girls® workshop, I asked the girls what they would do if they were called a mean name.  A second grade girl raised her hand and answered, “I’d call her a name back.” The revenge strategy is a typical response for girls that age.

Usually, an adult replies to such responses by telling girls, “Don’t do that.” But telling them not to seek revenge doesn’t teach them to do their own thinking.

Helping a Girl by Going Into Curiosity Mode

I recommend making the most of this teachable moment and going into curiosity (not judgmental) mode. The script goes something like this:

You: “So you’d call her a name in return. Hmm, that sounds like an interesting strategy. How would that make you feel?”
Girl: “It would make me feel good.”
You: “I can understand that.  So what do you think might happen next?”

Let’s pause here. Remember, the goal of the curiosity approach is to help the girl think through the consequences of her actions.

The conversation might continue something like this:

Girl: “She might cry, or she might call me the mean name again. She might call me another mean name, too.”
You: “Is that what you want to have happen?”
Girl: “No.”
You: “What do you want to have happen?”
Girl: “I want her to be nice to me.”

Helping Her Defuse the Situation

At this point, you can help guide the girl toward strategies that will help defuse the situation. Two of the best strategies are to ignore the name-calling and to speak up.

When girls ignore the name-calling, they take away the power of the name-calling by not reacting. Speaking up is another great strategy in this situation, because it empowers the target to take matters into her own hands and preserve her dignity as well as offer dignity to the other girl.

The target could respond to the bully with, “When you call me that, I don’t like it. I want you to call me by my name.”  Then, she should walk away.

With girls in second grade and younger, we translate the 3 Ds (Dignity for me, Dignity for you, Defuse the situation) into the 3 Okays: I feel okay, you feel okay and the problem works out okay. Revenge doesn’t achieve the 3 Okays in any bullying situation.

With your coaching, your girls will learn to think through the consequences of their actions. This will help them see that revenge is ineffective and not an okay strategy.

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

In Part 1, I shared two common responses girls give when asked, “When it comes to my friendships, I wish my parents would…”  They replied… 1.  Don’t call it drama.  2. Listen.

Here’s what else girls said…

3. Leave Me Alone

After your daughter feels listened to, you can ask if she wants your help.  Say, “Would you like help in solving your problem?”  Honor what she says.  No means no.  If she doesn’t want help, say, “I understand this is your problem and you want to solve it yourself.  I want you to know that I am here to help you if you want help.”  Then, back off.

It’s important to let her know you believe she can solve the problem.  Girls want their parents’ faith that they will do what is right for them.  Be available, but not clingy.

One exception to this rule is if your daughter has been on the receiving end of emotional (or physical) bullying for an extended period of time.  Or, if you are concerned for your daughter’s safety.  If you think she is at risk of hurting herself, it is time to get the support of professionals.

4. Help Me

Many girls wish their parents would be more effective at helping them through their friendship problems. They want help thinking about what to do and would like their parents to step in and work them through it.  They want good advice and guidance.

Girls who are happy with their parents’ support have parents who:

–  Offer effective, positive strategies that are relevant to their daughter’s problem.

–  Let their daughter choose her strategy.

–  Don’t get caught in the pain.  They remain grounded and positive and keep a healthy level of detachment from the problem.

–  Practice or role play the situation with their daughter.

–  Follow up in a casual, calm manner.

–  Bring in other help as needed.

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

Categories : Parents
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I teach workshops for grades K-8 girls to help them identify and successfully navigate through relational aggression. After every workshop, the girls are asked to complete an evaluation, so I can continually improve upon workshop content and delivery. I want to know what’s near and dear to girls’ hearts regarding emotional bullying.

The first time “it” happened, I was amazed. There it was in childlike scrawl in response to the question:

Question: What did you learn today?

Answer: I didn’t know I was a bully.

Imagine my amazement! The workshop helped one girl recognize her behaviors were of the bullying sort. My intention was to help girls successfully navigate through bullying, and it was a BIG bonus for someone to have an “aha” moment regarding their own bullying behaviors! I also thought it was a one-time answer.

And Then It Happened Again

Along came another workshop and another “I didn’t know I was a bully” answer. And then another and another. The answer became so prevalent I came to understand many girls didn’t recognize their behaviors as hurtful to others.

The Theory: We Can’t Assume

While it seems reasonable that girls should know what types of behaviors are hurtful to others, we can never assume they do.  So much of what they say and do is learned though role modeling, people watching, or media examples.  At a young age, it’s hard for girls to understand that the comment, “Whatever,” is sarcastic or dismissive or that eye rolling is a way to show disrespect or disdain.  When they’ve grown up with family or school teasing or name calling, why should they know these are not appropriate friendship-making skills?  When their childhood idols gossip and are routinely part of the rumor mill, why would it occur to them that talking negatively about others is hurtful?

Directly Teaching Friendship Skills

Let’s think about this.  Since a significant number of girls don’t realize their actions are bullying behaviors, why don’t we directly teach them positive friendship skills?  Instead of giving them a don’t list, let’s teach them how to be a good friend with steps to follow, positive examples, and practice opportunities.  Here is a list of lessons girls need to master in order to help them move away from relational aggression as a solution to their problems.

  1. How to ask for what you need.
  2. What to do when your friend is hurting another, and you don’t want to be a part of it.
  3. How to respectfully disagree.
  4. How to speak up.
  5. What to do when a friend is not acting like a friend.
  6. What to do when a friend acts like she owns you.
  7. When to ask an adult for help with a friendship.
  8. How to stay out of the cycle of gossip and rumors.
  9. How to excuse yourself from a group that is talking negatively about others.
  10. How to end a friendship that no longer works.

When girls learn these skills, they no longer will have to resort to relational aggression or emotional bullying to fulfill their needs.  That is exactly what many girls have been doing.  And they didn’t even realize they were bullies.

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

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 First do no harm.  When our kids tell us they‘ve been on the receiving end of emotional bullying, we want to help.  Our initial response, though, can be a deal maker or a deal breaker.  The goal is to help the individual open up and express herself, so she can then focus on choosing a solution that’s appropriate to her situation. 

 So, think of this as a great opportunity to be the door at which she comes a-knocking for help.  (Yes, you are the door!)  Your first remarks can either open that door up wide for further conversation or slam it shut in her face with the wrong comments.

 The good news is that the words to open up the conversation are simple and few, and she will do most of the talking.  You can pick or mix and match from this sample menu:

  • Tell me about it.
  • What was it like for you?
  • What would you like to have happen?
  • Let’s brainstorm some possible solutions.

 The door-slamming phrases are plentiful and common.  Stay away from these if you want to keep the lines of communication open.

  1. Oh, it can’t be that bad!
  2. Just be nice to them, dear, and they’ll be nice to you.
  3. Be mean back to her.
  4. Just go out to recess. It will be fine.
  5. Learn to take it. You’ll be a stronger person in the long run.
  6. Well, in my day it wasn’t this way.
  7. Girls are just mean!
  8. You’ll have to learn sooner or later that the world’s not a nice place.
  9. That’s just the way girls are.
  10. Learn to be friends with them.
  11. You won’t succeed in (middle school, high school, college, life) if you can’t take it now.
  12. I know what you mean.
  13. That’s the bad part about being female!
  14. I’m a man.  Go talk to your mother.
  15. Go play with boys then.  This doesn’t happen with them.
  16. Oh, I wish girls could be more like boys in handling problems.
  17. Your sister never had this problem.
  18. You’re only (5, 10, 15…).  Things could be much worse.
  19. You’re (10, 15, 20…). You should know how to handle this by now.
  20. You think that’s bad, just wait until you get out into the real world!

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC 

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

Comments (3)

Recently I facilitated a When Girls Hurt Girls® Parent/Daughter Workshop for 4th and 5th grade girls and their parents.  After the girls were warmed up and engaged in role playing, problem solving, and asking lots of questions, I asked the girls to finish this statement…

“When it comes to my friendships, I wish my parents would…”  Here’s what they said…

1. Don’t Call It Drama 

Girls feel belittled when their parents make comments like, “Oh, it’s just girl drama.”  It is insulting and arrogant to refer to anyone’s problem as “just” anything.  Emotional bullying and friendship problems are serious for girls.  We owe it to them to take them and their problems seriously.

The opportunity to help girls grow their social skills when they are young will more than pay off as they grow older and deal with boyfriends, bosses, roommates, etc.

2. Listen

This was one of the most common wishes the girls had.  They wish their parents really listened to them.  They wish their parents knew what’s going on.  They wish they could feel comfortable talking with their parents about friendships.  They wish their parents understood them.

Here are three tips for listening to your daughter about friendship problems:

Tip # 1:  Set your advice aside.

Advice should only come after you’ve listened to your daughter and asked if she wants your advice.  When your daughter brings up a friendship problem, your initial reaction may be to help her solve it.  Squelch this urge.  Instead, set your ideas aside (for the moment) and really listen to what she is dealing with and how she feels.

Tip # 2:  Ask questions.

There are two important types of questions to ask:

– Questions about what happened (Then what happened?  What did you do then?).  Get a feel for what went on and who is involved (and if an adult saw what happened).

– Questions about how she feels (How did that feel?)  Help her put vocabulary to her emotions.

Tip # 3:  Be a mirror.

Being a mirror means helping your daughter see herself more clearly.  You can only support her in this way if you are being non-judgmental.

Repeat back what you are hearing – both what happened and how she is feeling.  For example, “It sounds like you feel embarrassed whenever Chelsea calls you names and won’t let you sit at her lunch table.”  Or, “I notice that you keep wanting to play with Anna, even after she treats you poorly.”

Being a mirror helps bring clarity to her situation.  From there she is better able to make a wise decision.

In part 2, I’ll cover [3. Leave Me  Alone] and [4. Help Me].

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC 

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

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 Click Here to Read Part 1

“What do I do when I keep saying I’m sorry, but my friend won’t forgive me? Sometimes I don’t even know what I did wrong!”

In this article I explore the way some girls manipulate apologies by feigning hurt or sadness to control the girls who allow them to do so.

Females and Apologizing

 Females have a tendency to apologize too much.  When someone bumps into us, we are inclined to apologize for being in someone’s way.  If our kids forget to take their lunches to school, we apologize for not noticing as they raced through the door without their lunch boxes.  And if someone has hurt feelings, we rack our brains to figure out what we might have done to cause their pain.  Is it any wonder then that girls apologize to friends who hold them hostage through the manipulation of apologies?

It’s All About Connections

This is oh-so-common in girls’ world, so let’s look at it through the lens of connections.  The female brain seeks connections to others because of its organic hard wiring.  Let’s see how this plays out with elementary or junior high school girls.

A Typical Story

Girl A and Girl B are a part of a larger friendship group.  Girl A has been bossy and hurtful to Girl B.  Girl A’s intention is to separate herself from the person who causes her pain.

Girl B – I don’t want to be friends with you anymore.  You’re mean! 

Girl A (beginning to cry) –That’s not true!

Girl B – It is too!  (She walks away from Girl A).

Girl A begins crying harder.  The other girls in the group notice this.  They approach her and listen to her story about Girl B not wanting to be friends with her.  The group of girls approach Girl B and admonish her for hurting Girl A’s feelings.  Girl A returns to Girl B to apologize.

Analysis of the Situation

All of the girls in this scenario were motivated by their need for connections. 

Girl A wanted either to stay connected to Girl B or strengthen her connection with the group.  She cried to manipulate an outcome.  The crying could have been authentic due to upset feelings, but the outcome desired was a connection.  A girl who learns to use this powerful manipulation technique to her advantage often is able to get what she wants.  Unfortunately for her, however, she risks becoming unable to ask directly for what she needs.  Crying or blaming others lasts only as long as the group is unaware of her MO.  This girl eventually may only become capable of surface relationships, need to change friends or switch jobs frequently, or become a leader through the abuse of power at the expense of others.

Girl B wanted to disconnect from Girl A, but her desire for group connection was much stronger than her need to unhook from an undesirable relationship.  The ultimate hope for Girl B is to realize her needs won’t always be compatible with a group’s need for cohesiveness, and it’s OK to leave a group that is hurtful or unhealthy.  The best-case scenario for this girl is to come to understand that group membership needn’t supersede her need for health, safety, well-being, or happiness.  The worst outcome is that this girl will stay in abusive relationships.

The Group saw Girl B’s behavior – as explained by Girl A – as divisive.  It caused ripples in group cohesiveness.  Of course, if the girls had waited to listen to both sides of the story, the outcome may have been different.  The pressure to change or apologize could have been transferred to Girl A.  Groups usually tend to the greatest reaction first, though.  They act first and ask questions later.  Group cohesiveness at all costs creates a tendency to overlook and undervalue individuals’ needs.  This can lead to reality blindness and the loss of thinking for oneself.  Girls who only follow the crowd are, well, only followers.  Opportunities to become transformational leaders and creative thinkers become slimmer.

Back to the Question

 So, how can we help girls who keep apologizing even when they know there is nothing for which to apologize?  There’s a 1, 2, 3 answer.  Teach them to:

  1. Ask questions to learn the other person’s perspective.
  2. Honestly examine their behaviors to determine whether they own part of the problem.
  3. Trust their personal power guidance system, listen to their heart or gut and act accordingly, and own their behavior only.

 How Expensive is This Friendship?

Taking responsibility for someone’s hurt when you didn’t cause it doesn’t help anyone.  It’s a way to stay stuck for both parties involved.  Apologizing for a hurt you did not cause in order to keep a friend or group acceptance is very expensive.  It costs you your self-respect by holding you a prisoner of someone else’s wants and needs by sacrificing your own.  Please help the girls in your life to understand this.

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC 

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

Comments (2)

We should never do for children what they can do for themselves. Girls can and do work through their own friendship problems — we should trust them to learn and grow through their experiences. The girls who have these problem-solving skills can use them for a lifetime!

So what can you do to empower girls to solve issues from a young age? You can instill confidence and problem solving skills in girls by being reassuring when friends clash. Remove yourself from their emotional drama, and take the opportunity to talk about these three concepts:

Conflict is normal and friendship problems are common. Rather than playing into the drama of friendship problems, make the situation matter-of-fact. Try using yourself as a point of reference to let them know, “Oh, yeah, I know what that’s like. I’ve had that happen to me, too.” Then they’ll realize that conflict is part of everyday life.

Problems can be solved. Girls can learn that even though they have a disagreement, it doesn’t have a stay a disagreement. We can teach them to ask questions to resolve arguments and issues. We should work with girls to improve their listening skills so they understand another girl’s point of view. Tone of voice also plays a role in good communication.

We’re here to help, not solve. By showing faith in girls and their problem-solving abilities, we adults show them that we trust them. Make sure they know your door is open if they need help.

Let’s make a pact. Let’s stop swooping in to solve problems for our girls. Trust in their abilities! Be available to them. Nurture their social intelligence and communication skills to create independent problem solving, and you’ll be taking a huge leap toward fostering well-balanced, confident girls. What could be a better gift for the girl in your life?

© 2011 A Way Through, LLC

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Female friendship experts Jane Balvanz and Blair Wagner publish A Way Through, LLC’s Guiding Girls ezine. If you’re ready to guide girls in grades K – 8 through painful friendships, get your FREE mini audio workshop and ongoing tips now at www.AWayThrough.com

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Untitled Document When Girls Hurt Girls™ Parent Pack

Do you feel unequipped to help your daughter or students navigate painful friendships?

Finally, the instruction manual you need to help your Kindergarten – Grade 8 daughter or students find their way through painful friendships
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Listen to the program introduction here.

When Girls Hurt Girls™ is a home practice guide for parents who want to help their hurting daughters, but don’t know where to start. It's also PERFECT for use in school or small group settings.

Through loving discussions and role-play exercises, your daughter or students will connect with their personal power and gain the confidence to resolve conflicts and attract the right kind of friendships to their lives.

REMEMBER: Works great for educators and group/team leaders too!  

Untitled Document


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